Spring 2024

Spring 2024

CLST 07  First-Year Seminar  

CLST 10.12 The End of the World: Jewish and Christian Apocalyptic Literature in the Hellenistic Era   The Hellenistic era was a period of remarkable theological and literary creativity within the Jewish and Christian communities, including the development of a unique genre, apocalyptic literature. Apocalyptic texts, which portend a catastrophic end to the world, are notoriously difficult to interpret due to their use of fantastical imagery and often cryptic symbolism.  In this class we will explore several texts in depth, including portions of Daniel from the Hebrew scriptures, the Book of Enoch from the Maccabean period, the Apocalypse of John (Revelation) from the Christian scriptures, and the 2nd century Christian text Apocalypse of Peter. In addition to learning how to read apocalyptic literature, we will examine the socio-historical context of these texts, their relationship to communities under duress and how they have been reimagined by later generations. TMV, W. Whaley

CLST 10.15 Gender and Sexuality  How did the ancient Greeks think about sex, gender, and sexuality? Which behaviors and relationships were considered socially acceptable, and why? And what does it mean to seek out ancient Greek models for contemporary queer identities? This course examines the construction of gender and sexuality in ancient Greece through the study of written texts, material culture, and feminist and queer theory. LIT, CI. Schultz

CLST 14  Archaic and Classical Greece (CE eligible)  This course is designed to survey the major events in the history of ancient Greece from c.1600 B.C. (the emergence of palatial culture in the Mycenaean World) to 404 B.C. (the end of the Peloponnesian War). During this period, the Greeks formed individual communities and developed unique political structures, spread their culture, language, and religion throughout the Mediterranean, invented democracy (at Athens) and enshrined these values in their art and literature. This course will cover the physical setting of and the archaic legacy to the classical city-state, its economy, its civic and religious institutions, the waging of war between cities, the occurrence and ancient analysis of conflict within the city, and the public and private lives of its citizens and less well-known classes, such as women, children, slaves, etc. SOC, W. Christesen

CLST 22 Greek Archaeology: The Classical Period (CE eligible)  From the allied Greeks' expulsion of Persian invaders through their great victories at Plataea and Mykale in 479 B.C. to their catastrophic defeat by Philip, Alexander, and the Macedonians at Chaeronea In 338 B.C., the history of Greek culture is that of dozens of individual city-states in constant competition for hegemony in a wide variety of different arenas, from battlefield to stadium to pan-Hellenic sanctuary. In this course, particular attention is paid to the material cultural achievements of the richest and artistically most influential of these poleis, the city of Athens, when that city developed the western world's first democracy, built the Parthenon, and played host to the schools established by Plato and Aristotle. ART, W. Hruby

GRK 1.02/3.02  Intensive Greek    A double course (two time slots) covering both GRK 1 and GRK 3 in a single term. Introduces all the basics of grammar and syntax and provides a gradual introduction to the reading of continuous texts. Satisfies the College language requirement. Tell.

GRK 3   Intermediate Greek  Continued study of Greek grammar and syntax and an introduction to reading in prose authors. Satisfies the College language requirement. Whaley,

GRK 30.07 The End of the World: Jewish and Christian Apocalyptic Literature in the Hellenistic Era  The Hellenistic era was a period of remarkable theological and literary creativity within the Jewish and Christian communities, including the development of a unique genre, apocalyptic literature. Apocalyptic texts, which portend a catastrophic end to the world, are notoriously difficult to interpret due to their use of fantastical imagery and often cryptic symbolism.  In this class we will explore several texts in depth, including portions of Daniel from the Hebrew scriptures, the Book of Enoch from the Maccabean period, the Apocalypse of John (Revelation) from the Christian scriptures, and the 2nd century Christian text Apocalypse of Peter. In addition to learning how to read apocalyptic literature, we will examine the socio-historical context of these texts, their relationship to communities under duress and how they have been reimagined by later generations.  TMV, W. Whaley

LAT 2   Latin 2  Continues the study of the Latin language, with a look at the history and culture of Roman Britain and the city of Rome in the first century AD. Includes an introduction to Roman funerary inscriptions, curse tablets, and coins.

LAT 3   Latin 3  Completes the introduction to Latin grammar and syntax, then moves into unadapted selections from Pliny, Catullus, Ovid, and other Roman authors. Satisfies the College language requirement.

LAT 34 Letter-writing at Rome (CE eligible) The Romans considered letter-writing an important skill and adapted the letter form to many purposes: maintaining friendship, promoting political ends, consolation, education, artistry, and sheer entertainment. Readings will come from the prose letters of Cicero, Seneca, or Pliny; personal notes and letters recovered from archaeological sites; and/or the verse epistles of Ovid or Horace. Graver