News & Events

  • Students from CLST 24 (Professor Ulrich) and Latin 15 (Professor Kuin) went on a field trip to The Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, MA.

  • David Ratzan, Institute for the Study of the Ancient World, NYU
    Haldeman 41, 4:30 pm
    Thursday, October 18, 2018, 4:30 pm
    Free and open to the public!

    The Sortes Astrampsychi (The Lots of Astrampsychus) was an oracle book from the Roman East that worked something like an ancient Magic 8-Ball. One chose from a set menu of questions, like "Will I go abroad?" "Will my wife give birth?" and "Will I win my suit?"; picked a random number between 1 and 10; and magically--and...

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  • Prof. Lynn is joining us this fall as the Language Program Director for the entire first year's worth of courses in Greek and Latin. She comes to us from the University of California, Santa Cruz, where she has taught Latin and Greek at all levels for over a decade.

    She received her PhD from Columbia University, with a specialty in the poetry of Callimachus. At UCSC she was very involved in the creation of their Center for Innovative Learning, in the Academic Advising Program, and in...

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  • Please join us in welcoming Prof. Scott Arcenas, who will be teaching ancient history for the 2018-19 academic year. With a 2018 PhD from Stanford University, Prof. Arcenas is an expert in the political and economic history of the ancient Mediterranean. In addition to CLST 15 (Alexander and the Macedonian Kings), he will be teaching a special topics class this winter on Democracy, Ancient and Modern, as well as CLST 19 (Methods and Theory in Ancient History) in the spring.

    His current...

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  • Annual Zarbin Lecture

    Thursday, October 25, 2018 
    4:30 pm
    Moore Hall B03
    Reception to follow!
    Brooke Holmes, Princeton University

    Prof. Holmes' research explores the Greco-Roman roots of Western ideas about the physical body, the natural world, matter, and the non-human. She is especially interested in the problems these ideas create for concepts of the subject, ethics, and politics. She also studies the long afterlife of these ideas, especially in twentieth...

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  •  IN MEMORIAM: Professor Norman Doenges Generations of Dartmouth students will remember the history lectures on Greece and Rome given by Professor Norman Doenges, who taught in the Classics Department for four full decades, from 1955 until his retirement in 1995.  For eleven summers, from 1984 to 1995, Professor Doenges took Dartmouth students to Spain with him to excavate at the Roman colony of Pollentia on the island of Mallorca off the south coast of Spain.  Colleagues in the Classics...

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  • Please join us for the Classics Open House during First-Year Orientation. This is a perfect chance to learn more about Classics courses for the coming year -- Fall, Winter, and Spring -- and to meet many of the professors. The event will be held:

    Friday, September 7, 2018, Reed 108, 12:00 pm

     

  • This summer’s Classical Mythology (CLST4) students were given the option of doing a creative project to complete the class. Some students learned new skills, while others drew from experience, always in order to put a new, original spin on what they had learned about ancient Greek and Roman myths in the class.We are showcasing here the projects of all students who agreed to be included in the exhibit. This online exhibit has a counterpart in an offline exhibit in the Classics Department...

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  • Emily Katz Anhalt, Classics Department, Sarah Lawrence College, Dartmouth '80, Yale University
    Wednesday, August 8, 2018, 12:50 pm, Black Family Visual Arts Center, room 104

    A fascinating new study of three classic works of ancient Greek literature, exposing their enduring relevance. These stories, by Homer, Sophocles, and Euripides, all emphasize the consequences of glorifying violent rage and cultivate instead the capacity for empathy, self-restraint, and rational debate. Emily...

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  • Twenty-two people from across the U.S. gathered on campus recently for five days to discuss Homer’s Odyssey. Their goal: to use the epic poem to draw parallels between war hero Odysseus’ long journey home after the Trojan War and the struggles veterans face today. 

    The group included a linguist, an archaeologist, a high school teacher, veteran clinicians and service providers, and Dartmouth student veterans and alumni, among others. They were there because a Dartmouth professor was...

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