Winter 2023

Winter 2023

CLST 01.03  Antiquity Today   The Romans had the Colosseum, the Greeks had the dramatic stage. What does the different ways they staged violence tell us about the Romans and the Greeks? Topics we cover include Greek and Roman attitudes toward violence, their approaches to classifying and evaluating sexual behaviors, their religious beliefs, and the ways they governed their societies. In all cases we will use what we learn about the Greek and Roman ways of doing things to help think about our own practices and predilections. There are no pre-requisites for this course, and you need not have completed any prior course work on the ancient world. CI. Christesen. 2

CLST 06   Introduction to Classical Archaeology Introduces the basic methods and principles of Classical archaeology. Students will acquire an appreciation of the development of material culture in the Mediterranean world from prehistory to the collapse of the Roman Empire.  INT or ART, W. course flyer Hruby - 2

CLST 10.14  Plato's Symposium. A small-enrollment seminar offering an introduction to Plato's thought and to a rich vein of material illustrating Greek attitudes and assumptions on erotic love for both sexes. The primary text is Plato's Symposium, which we will study in translation while learning the Greek alphabet and a few key vocabulary items in Greek. As time allows during the term, we will explore some of the rich body of evidence that exists in Greek poetry, oratory, and the visual arts either confirming or contradicting the impression given by Plato. TMV, W. Graver. 10

CLST 15  Alexander the Great and the Macedonian Kings  This course has two aims: (1) to establish a basic understanding of the history of Alexander the Great and of Greek-speaking peoples in the eastern Mediterranean during the fourth through first centuries BCE and (2) to explore the cultural, military, political, and economic innovations of what was a singular age of experimentation. INT or SOC, W.  Christesen. 11

CLST 19  Methods and Theory in Ancient History   This course is designed to introduce the student to the various types of documentary evidence available to the ancient historian and to the various perspectives for framing and answering historical questions. We consider the interpretive methodologies for each type of document (coin, inscription, papyrus) as well as the particular historical context in which these documents were produced. Topics include the function of coinage and economic thinking in the ancient world and the political significance of the publication of law. The final weeks of the term allow for in-depth consideration of a specific problem in ancient history. SOC, W.  Stewart. 12

GRK 1 Introductory Ancient Greek  Study of Greek grammar, syntax, and vocabulary accompanied by reading of simple Greek prose selections. This course is designed to be followed immediately by GRK 3 in a two-term sequence. Foxley. 9L

GRK 28 Plato   A small-enrollment seminar offering an introduction to Plato's thought and to a rich vein of material illustrating Greek attitudes and assumptions on erotic love for both sexes. The primary text is Plato's Symposium.  As time allows during the term, we will explore some of the rich body of evidence that exists in Greek poetry, oratory, and the visual arts either confirming or contradicting the impression given by Plato. TMV, W  Graver.  10

LAT 1   Latin 1    A rapid introduction to the Latin language through reading passages of gradually increasing difficulty, with an introduction to the history and culture of Pompeii and Roman Egypt in the first century AD.  course flier. Lynn. 9L

LAT 2   Latin 2 Continues the study of the Latin language, with a look at the history and culture of Roman Britain and the city of Rome in the first century AD. Includes an introduction to Roman funerary inscriptions, curse tablets, and coins. Lynn, Foxley, Gaki. 9L, 10, 2

LAT 10.03 Topics in Latin Texts: Petronius' Satyricon and Neronian Rome  An introduction to continuous readings of unadapted Latin prose in combination with a comprehensive review of Latin grammar via the hilariously bizarre novel Satyricon, written by a certain Petronius during the reign of the emperor Nero. By the end of the quarter, you will have a thorough familiarity with Petronius' grammar, vocabulary, and style, and will be able to discuss questions of language and interpretation. We will occasionally supplement our primary readings with excerpts from Petronius' contemporaries or near-contemporaries (e.g. Seneca, Lucan, Tacitus) to help paint a picture of the carnivalesque madness that was Neronian Rome. This course is designed for students who have completed at least the Latin 1, 2, and 3 sequence at Dartmouth, or who have previously studied the basics of Latin grammar but are looking for a systematic grammatical review. LIT, W. Glauthier. 10

LAT 33  The Literature of Science   The ancient Greeks and Romans studied natural phenomena passionately and considered the pursuit of scientific knowledge a mind-transforming experience that was sublime and potentially even sacred. This class will study one or more key texts in the Roman scientific tradition. Readings will be drawn from poets, such as Lucretius and Manilius, and/or prose authors, like Seneca and the Elder Pliny. Potential topics include ancient physics, astronomy, meteorology, and natural history. Glauthier. 10A