Winter 2022

CLST 07  First-Year Seminar: The Collapse of Civilizations in the Ancient Mediterranean  Examines the latest methods and theories used by scholars to conceptualize the topics of collapse and resilience and apply them to the ancient Mediterranean world. Sources used include the scientific evidence for ancient climate change and disease, the archaeological evidence for social organization and destruction, and textual accounts written by ancient Greeks and Romans themselves. Through blog posts and other short writing assignments students learn to build arguments from an interdisciplinary suite of evidence.  Hruby. D

CLST 10.14  Plato's Symposium. A small-enrollment seminar offering an introduction to Plato's thought and to a rich vein of material illustrating Greek attitudes and assumptions on erotic love for both sexes. The primary text is Plato's Symposium, which we will study in translation while learning the Greek alphabet and a few key vocabulary items in Greek. As time allows during the term, we will explore some of the rich body of evidence that exists in Greek poetry, oratory, and the visual arts either confirming or contradicting the impression given by Plato.TMV, W. Graver. F

CLST 10.16  Ancient Medicine  This course will explore the Greek and Roman origins of medicine in the West. We will analyze how disease came to be understood as a natural phenomenon, and we will examine the different procedures, philosophies, and social roles of doctors in the ancient world. In this investigation, we will encounter many questions with which we are still grappling today, such as: What constitutes scientific thinking? How do science and cultural context determine and reflect one another? What is human nature? Is a disease a moral failing? How do we understand gender and sex in medical terms? All readings will be in translation, and no prior knowledge of medicine or Greco-Roman antiquity is necessary. TMV, W. Glauthier. D

CLST 11.06/REL 31/WGSS 43.02  Sex, Celibacy, and the Problem of Purity: Asceticism and the Human Body in Late Antiquity  Late Antiquity (c. 300-500 C.E.) was a time when Christians struggled to understand how gender, family life, and religion could intermesh. Did virgins get to heaven faster than those who marry? Can a chaste man and woman live together without succumbing to lust? Were men holier than women? What about women who behaved like men? This course examines the changing understanding of the body, marriage, sexuality, and gender within Christianity through reading saints' lives, letters, polemical essays, and legal texts. TMV, W. MacEvitt.

CLST 11.19: Before Billboards and Twitter: Roman Coins as Context. This course focuses on the coin production of ancient Rome, the development and use of money at Rome, the logistics of coin production, and the methods for studying coinage to write ancient history. Roman coinage offers a rare type of evidence from the ancient world and a path of discovery: a continuous at times annual record. Of even more potential value for the ancient historian: in issuing coins the Roman government exploited the potential of a commonly circulated medium to carry value-laden symbols and captions throughout the Roman world and beyond, wherever money changed hands. Nowhere else in the ancient world can we watch a discourse so systematically and comprehensively as we can on coins. Moreover coins often bring forward communities and persons otherwise unrecorded in other ancient sources, allowing us to nuance the political narratives of the literary sources in terms of local traditions or individual identity (gender, ethnicity, religion). The problem: how to interpret accurately and most fully the evidence of the coins—their symbols and wording-- in order to write ancient history. In this hands-on course, students will learn the basics of numismatic methodology and the history of Roman coinage during the Republic and Principate, by handling and studying ancient coins from the collection in Dartmouth's Hood Museum of Art. Students will learn numismatic methods (die study, hoard analysis, metrology and type identification, iconographic study) that allow us to consider coins as documentary sources in their own right. A final unit treats the ethics of coin collecting and the role of the modern museum. Students will prepare material for a coin installation and research the possible purchase of a coin for the Hood museum collection. SOC. Stewart. TBD.

CLST 21 Greek Archaeology: Early Iron Age and Archaic   This course examines in detail through archaeology the cultural process whereby Greece evolved from a scattered group of isolated and backward villages in the Dark Ages (ca. 1100-750 B.C.) to a series of independent, often cosmopolitan city-states united against the threat of Xerxes' invasion of Greece in 480 B.C. Where did the Greeks acquire the concept of monumental temple architecture and why did they choose to build temples in only two or three different architectural styles? Where did the Greeks learn to write in an alphabetic script and what did they first write down? Who taught the Greeks the art of sculpture and why did they begin by carving what they did? When and why did the Greeks begin to portray their myths in art? May be taken in partial fulfillment of the major in Art History. SOC, W. Hruby. C.

GRK 28: Plato's Symposium   A small-enrollment seminar offering an introduction to Plato's thought and to a rich vein of material illustrating Greek attitudes and assumptions on erotic love for both sexes. The primary text is Plato's Symposium, which we will study in the original language using an extraordinarily helpful study text by Louise Pratt (Eros at the Banquet). As time allows during the term, we will explore some of the rich body of evidence that exists in Greek poetry, oratory, and the visual arts either confirming or contradicting the impression given by Plato. TMV, W. Graver. F

LAT 1  - Introductory Latin I    A rapid introduction to the Latin language through reading passages of gradually increasing difficulty, with an introduction to the history and culture of Pompeii and Roman Egypt in the first century AD. - course flyer -  Staff - BL

LAT 2 - Introductory Latin II Continues the study of the Latin language, with a look at the history and culture of Roman Britain and the city of Rome in the first century AD. Includes an introduction to Roman funerary inscriptions, curse tablets, and coins. Glauthier, Staff BL, C

LAT 10: Reading Latin Texts  An introduction to continuous readings of Latin prose and poetry in combination with a review of Latin grammar. Students develop the necessary language and study skills to allow them to take more advanced Latin courses. LIT, W.  Lynn. C

LAT 29  - Courtroom Speech    In this class we will read Cicero's speech for Aulus Cluentius (Pro Cluentio) as an example of Roman legal argument. In 66 BCE Cicero defended Aulus Cluentius on a charge of murdering his stepfather Statius Albius Oppianicus. Both men—as well as many others involved in the case--came from local towns in Roman Italy. The stakes for conviction: loss of civic status, essentially a social death. Cicero's defense of his client provides a masterly example of courtroom defense strategies (the mustering of evidence, witness testimony, manipulation of legal procedures) and the courtroom story-telling that created presumptive realities of "wrong" and "truth," of "innocence" or "guilt." The speech thus affords insight into questions of Roman courtroom procedure and judicial integrity, of the assimilation of Italians within the Roman social and political community and access to Roman law, and of the social expectations of gender as a rhetorical strategy in courtroom speech. SOC. Stewart.  J